Akwaaba in Côte d'Ivoire
"AKWAABA" means 'welcome' in twi, a language of the Ashanti people of our dear neighboring nation Ghana. It also has the same meaning in Côte d’Ivoire. Therefore we say Akwaaba to you. Welcome to Côte d’Ivoire a.k.a Ivory Coast. This platform has been set to educate and display a different side of my beloved nation, Côte d’Ivoire, through videos, ideas, and images of our music, arts, film, literature, cultures, traditions, food, sports, dances, and everything in between. I dearly hope that you go visit it for yourself one day, but until that day please care to look, read, and discover. Thank you.
thegitegallery:

Check out these gorgeous colorful Baule masks from the Ivory Coast that we just got in! 

thegitegallery:

Check out these gorgeous colorful Baule masks from the Ivory Coast that we just got in! 

architectureofdoom:

Societe Generale bank, Abidjan (Ivory Coast), Henri Chomette, 1955

manufactoriel:

Senufo cloth

manufactoriel:

Senufo cloth

africanstories:

Cote d’Ivoire, Abidjan, portrait of smiling black girl in front of container classroom
(c) Art in All of Us /Anthony Asael (a Corbis photographer)

africanstories:

Cote d’Ivoire, Abidjan, portrait of smiling black girl in front of container classroom

(c) Art in All of Us /Anthony Asael (a Corbis photographer)

kicktv:

Didier, time to qualify for another World Cup?

kicktv:

Didier, time to qualify for another World Cup?

africanstories:

Cote d’Ivoire, Abidjan, black boy jumping in the air
(c) Art in All of Us /Anthony Asael (a Corbis photographer)

africanstories:

Cote d’Ivoire, Abidjan, black boy jumping in the air

(c) Art in All of Us /Anthony Asael (a Corbis photographer)

studioafrica:

Michael Jackson in Cote d’Ivoire, Gabon + Senegal

Throughout his life, Michael Jackson made quite a few trips to the continent, performing in Tunisia, gladhanding with dictator Omar Bongo in Gabon and finding any opportunity to hug President Nelson Mandela (wouldn’t you?). Okayafrica is celebrating the King of Pop’s birthday by collecting and analyzing some of the images of MJ in Africa - from his first trip as a sixteen year old in 1974 to his more controversial 1992 “African tour.” 

kenteboys:

Woro Woro in Abidjan, Kente Boys, 2013

kenteboys:

Woro Woro in Abidjan, Kente Boys, 2013

cutfromadiffcloth:

Brand: Loza Maléombho New York

Designer: Loza Maléombho

S/S 2014 Lookbook

cutfromadiffcloth.tumblr.com

studioafrica:

Collage by Massogona Sylla 

Massogona Sylla is a young Parisian from Cote d’Ivoire. Passionate, playful and modern, Massogona has always been attracted to the art world. Even as a child she frequented museums, raved about the paintings and was interested in all forms of art whether classic or street. Growing up, she fed this passion by trying to create her own art: first as a model, then on the other side of the camera as a photographer.  Her influences include Andy Warhol, Pablo Picasso, David Lachapelle, Jean-Paul Goude and Jean-Michel Basquiat.

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naija-soul-bro:

Touchin’ Body - J.Martins ft. DJ Arafat. Its a Naija-Ivory Coast combo. Sick beat. I hear this song a lot these days.

kenteboys:


Lagune Ébrié, Kente Boys, 2013

kenteboys:

Lagune Ébrié, Kente Boys, 2013

fantastyck:

photogapher: Daniel Serymakeup/styling: Ebah Koffimodel: Anta Bamba
KLASSYFILMS STUDIOS

fantastyck:

photogapher: Daniel Sery
makeup/styling: Ebah Koffi
model: Anta Bamba


KLASSYFILMS STUDIOS

afrikani:

Agnibilécro-Kangah, a chief of the Anyi, Ivory Coast circa 1920. The seated ruler wears a Bondoukou style cloth, much prized by collectors now. More info here.

afrikani:

Agnibilécro-Kangah, a chief of the Anyi, Ivory Coast circa 1920. The seated ruler wears a Bondoukou style cloth, much prized by collectors now. More info here.

ourafrica:

Coupé-Décalé is a type of popular dance music originating from Côte d’Ivoire and the Ivorian diaspora in Paris, France. Drawing heavily from Zouglou, Zouk, Coupé-Décalé is a very percussive style featuring African samples, deep bass, and repetitive, minimalist arrangements

While Coupé-Décalé is known as Côte d’Ivoire’s definitive pop music, it actually began in Paris, created by a group of Ivorian DJs at the Atlantis, an African nightclub in northeast Paris. These Djs, known as the ‘Jet Set’ became popular for their flamboyant style, often showing up at the club with large amounts of cash which they would hand out to audiences on the dance floor. Their aesthetic defined the early sounds of Coupé Décalé, apparent in the genre’s name. In Nouchi (Ivorian slang) Couper means to cheat and decaler means to run away, so Coupé-Décalé basically means to cheat somebody and run away. The ‘somebody’ cheated is generally interpreted to mean France or the West/Europe, finding parallels to the idea of “The Man” in American culture. Especially in the beginning, the songs often celebrated those who had used guile to ‘make it’ abroad. The genre’s first hit, “Sagacité” was pioneered by the late Stephane Doukouré (a.k.a. “Douk-Saga”), a member of the ‘Jet Set’, during the post-2002 militaro-political crisis in Côte d’Ivoire. The hit became a success in African clubs in Paris and spread quickly among djs in Côte d’Ivoire. According to Siddhartha Mitter of Afropop, “[Coupé-Décalé ] has become very popular at a time of conflict; in fact, Ivorian music has really for the first time taken over dance floors all over Africa at exactly the same time that Ivory Coast, the country, has been going through this protracted political and military crisis, with debilitating social and economic effects”. Although arising from this time of political turmoil, Coupé-Décalé lyrically addresses topics such as relationships, earning money and maintaining a good mood or ‘bonne ambiance’. Much of its lyrics refer to specific dance moves, often referencing current events such as the avian flu dance or Guantanamo (with hand movements imitating hands raised in chains). These global themes could have helped to make Coupé-Décalé so deeply popular across a politically divided Côte d’Ivoire and spread its influence so far across Africa and the diaspora. Increasingly non-Ivorian artists, particularly in the Congo, are beginning to play and incorporate the musical style. Notably among these artists are Congolese Djouna “Big One” Mumbafu and French/Malian rapper Mokobe with “Bisous” feat. Dj Lewis and “On Est Ensemble” feat. Molare. Even outside of African and its diaspora, there has been a growing interest in coupé décalé. In February 2009 Akwaaba Music released an Ivorian and Ghanaian compilation, one of the first legal worldwide releases of coupé décalé, highlighting some of the recent coupé décalé released in Côte d’Ivoire. The compilation features music by DJ Menza, DJ Bonano, DJ Mix 1er & Eloh DJ and Kedjevara.